Category Archives: College Football

15Mar

Ed Marinaro is an actor. You likely know his recent work on Blue Mountain State. Or, perhaps, you remember him on Hill Street Blues.

Marinaro also starred as a football player at Cornell, where he was a three-time All-American. He played for six seasons in the NFL. Podcast of his conversation with Robert after the jump.

14Mar

Disgraced Ohio State football head coach Jim Tressel apologized to Buckeye fans in his first public speaking engagement since being fined and suspended for NCAA violations.

Speaking to a packed dining room full of 400 fans — many of them clad in the Buckeyes’ scarlet and gray colors — at a luncheon sponsored by the Pro Football Hall of Fame, Tressel began his remarks by saying he couldn’t say much about the recent troubles at Ohio State.

He then said, “I sincerely apologize for what we’ve been through.”
- Washington Post

9Mar

Today’s guests:

Click through for a commercial-free podcast of today’s show.


9Mar

Spencer Tillman is the lead studio analyst for College Football Today on CBS. He joined Robert today to talk about the Ohio State MemorabiliaGate scandal that has led to the suspension of head coach Jim Tressel. Podcast after the jump.

9Mar

A man from Indiana has sold his breathtakingly thorough sports audio archive to the Library of Congress.

Many sports fans also share a love of at least one sport on the radio. And radio – as we are quick to point out, being in the business of radio – is a marvellous theatre of the mind: hyper-specific sonic images are brought to the ear, and yet the blank canvass of visual imagery remains. This is why, for example, baseball on the radio is so evocative.

Baseball sounds, smells, thoughts, and images, are important and central parts of many of our core memories from early life. That we can re-imagine those distant memories on a near-daily basis well into our adulthood by the simple act of tuning into a ball game is one of life’s little acid trips.

9Mar

Ohio State football coach Jim Tressel will miss two games due to suspension in the 2011 season. He will also pay a fine of $250,000. These are the punishments handed down by Ohio State in light of a Yahoo Sports report that said Tressel withheld potentially damaging information about Buckeye players selling memorabilia.

The sale of memorabilia by student-athletes governed by the NCAA is a violation of NCAA rules. Tressel did not report what he knew for months.


8Mar

Today’s guests:

Please enjoy a commercial-free podcast of today’s show after the jump.

8Mar

Yahoo Sports is reporting Ohio State head football Coach Jim Tressel knew that several of his players were selling memorabilia months before the university became aware of the players activity

Tressel received information that players were selling items to Edward Rife – the owner of Fine Line Ink Tattoos in Columbus – as early as April 2010, according to a source. However, neither Ohio State nor the NCAA investigated the transactions or the players’ relationship with Rife until December 2010, when the school claims it was informed of the situation by the local United States Attorney’s office.
- Yahoo Sports

Remember investigative journalism? That’s that thing that they had back in the 20th century, when people read the newspaper. Media companies made long-term investments in tenacious yet professional reporters. It was the reporters’ jobs to find out stuff that wasn’t being reported by everyone else.

7Mar

Barry Tompkins has had a dream career. He’s currently the television play-by-play voice of the Pac-10. He was forever immortalized as the ringside announcer in the climactic scene of Rocky IV. Barry joined Robert to talk college hoops as we head into March Madness. Podcast after the jump.


4Mar

Here’s the smoke. Where’s the fire?

A state website in Oregon, in the process of disclosing state expenditures (a good and decent thing in our democratic society), has linked a $25,000 payment by the University of Oregon to a Texas man. Dude has connections to at least two current Duck football players.